a friendly reminder

beahbeah:

marfmellow:

that calling women of color exotic is

  • fucking racist
  • dehumanizing
  • othering
  • and not a fucking compliment

image

(x)

albedosoyna:

birdmusings:

bioandrunaway:

elerena:

pyralspite:

frivilosity:

pyralspite:

frivilosity:

pyralspite:

check out this new keyboard i bought

HOW RICH ARE YOU

The keyboard was only like $60 dude

THE FUCKING KEYBOARD IS 60 DOLLARS TOO

ARE YOU KIDDING ME

BUT

OH MY GOD

I’M TALKING ABOUT YOUR ENTIRE DESK

The desk cost me like $75 from Ikea

Okay… am I crazy, or is that just a massive collection of dildos?

Man, that’s an excellent screen setup, I’m jealous.

albedosoyna is that you

The dildos look like they are tied down so they don’t wander off.

asylum-art:

Ashley Mackenzie: The Philosophical Illustrations

artist on Tumblr

Ashley Mackenzie tackles complex questions about the relationship between mind and body, creating conceptual, illustrative works that stand at the cross-section of the philosophy of the mind and neuroscience. “As our knowledge of the brain becomes more comprehensive, it seems like the idea of the soul exists only in the gaps of our understanding,” Mackenzie writes on her website. Bodies melt like pools of liquid in these placid, sparsely-detailed illustrations as they visualize the inner workings of the mind.

artbymoga:

My perfect day.

asylum-art:

Magical Paths Begging To Be Walked

Roads and paths pervade our literature, poetry, artwork, linguistic expressions and music. Even photographers can’t keep their eyes (and lenses) off of a beautiful road or path, which is why we collected this list of 28 amazing photos of paths.

Paths like these have a powerful grip on the human imagination – they can bring adventure, promise and change or solitude, peace and calm. There’s nothing like a walk down a beautiful path to clear your head – or to fill it with ideas!

I’ll leave you with an excellent quote from J. R. R. Tolkien’s works while you enjoy these images; “It’s a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don’t keep your feet, there’s no knowing where you might be swept off to.

  1. Autumn In The White Carpathians
  2. Rhododendron Laden Path, Mount Rogers, Virginia, USA
  3. Spring In Hallerbos Forest, Belgium
  4. Autumn Path In Kyoto, Japan 
  5. Autumn Path
  6. Bamboo Path In Kyoto, Japan
  7. Hitachi Seaside Park Path In Japan
  8. Dark Hedges In Ireland
  9. Winter Forest Path, Czech Republic
  10. Path Under Blooming Trees In Spring
Anonymous asked:
In my story the main girl gets raped. This is a big part of the story but does not happen until later in and it changes things in the story. How do I write this without making it a plot device.

enantodromia replied:

thewritingcafe:

  • If this is the only thing that makes your character change, you are using this as a plot device.
  • If this is the only that that gives your character a character arc/narrative, you are using this as a plot device.
  • If you are using rape for the sole purpose of shocking your readers, you are using this as a plot device.
  • Not applicable to you, but if the person raped is a disposable character (i.e., one who only exists to be raped), you are using this as a plot device.
  • If you are using rape to “punish” a character, you are using this as a plot device.
  • If you are using the rape of a disposable female character to act as a motivator for a lead male, you are not only using rape as a plot device, but you are putting a woman in the fridge.

Give your character agency, make sure rape isn’t what “makes them strong”, and don’t use it to prove a point to another character.

More:

#i feel like tilda is everyone’s earth mother #someone approaches her and she’s all did you try that stress relieving oatmeal and eucalyptus body scrub i was talking about #you had to mix it in a clay pot remember #good that’s good i thought your aura seemed lighter #even people she doesn’t know she’s like i’m sensing unwellness what can i do tell me what i can do

cam damage + cuttlefish | by the sensual eye

elise white